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5 Zone 5 Perennials That Bloom All Summer

Perennials are well-loved because they come back year after year. Low-maintenance, show stoppers that will bloom all summer are even better! If you're in zone 5, you might wonder what perennials bloom all summer long? Stay tuned because we researched the answer for you.

There are 5 different perennials that will bloom beautifully for you in Zone 5. Here is a list:

  1. Lavender
  2. Coral Bells
  3. Delphinium
  4. Phlox
  5. Daylily

Let's dig a little deeper and find out more about each plant. You also might be wondering, what kind of soil do these perennials love? Or, how often do I have to water because of the mild summers? Continue reading for the answers to these questions and more!

Multicolored-flowerbed-on-a-lawn, 5 Zone 5 Perennials That Bloom All Summer

Where is Zone 5?

First, let's establish where Zone 5 is. According to the USDA's hardiness zones the following states are all Zone 5.

Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Maine, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Montana, Wyoming, California, Oregon, Washington, West Virginia, Idaho, Colorado, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, and Alaska all apply.

These states normally have mild summers and chilly winters, with temperatures dropping into the negatives. Growing seasons are from late spring to mid-fall.

Which Zone 5 Perennials Bloom All Summer?

Because of the extremely cold winters, few perennials bloom all summer. Despite that, some hardy plants survive and thrive during the mild summer temperatures. Let's review the top 5 perennials that will bloom all summer in Zone 5:

1. Lavender

Bushes of lavender in landscape design. Lavender in the garden.

Who doesn't love the smell of Lavender? People normally grow this popular plant for its fragrant, purple flowers. It is a drought-tolerant, trouble-free perennial, making it a wonderful addition to your landscape.

Soil: 

Well-draining soil is a must for Lavender. If it gets too much water, fungal diseases or root rot could develop and kill your plant. Also, make sure to space the plants with adequate room between each other to allow for proper airflow and ventilation.

Light:

Make sure your Lavender is in a sunny location. This plant thrives in desert-like areas with plenty of sun, so avoid the shade if possible. You can also grow lavender inside as long as it receives plenty of light, preferably in a South-facing window.

Water:

Lavender needs very little water once it establishes itself. Shoot for watering about once a week and fully soak the ground. However, skip the watering to prevent root rot if it rained recently.

Tips: 

Prune Lavender often to keep your plant looking tidy. Pruning helps establish new growth and keeps your plant in good shape. Prune away!

Click here to see these Lavender seeds on Amazon

2. Coral Bells

Beautiful natural background of purple leaves of Heuchera, also called alumroot, coral bells

Coral Bells, also known as alumroot, can vary in color like brown, purple, pink, and more! Their bell-shaped flowers bloom all summer long. They're increasingly popular because of their unique heart-shaped foliage and low maintenance.

Soil: 

Enriched soil with compost helps keep Coral Bells looking fresh. It loves moist but well-drained soil that's neutral to slightly acidic. Also, mulching helps to keep the soil moist in hotter areas.

Light: 

These perennials prefer a shaded area to partial sun. They naturally grow in wooded areas so plant these beauties somewhere that receives filtered sunlight. They especially look nice next to shade-loving Hosta's.

Water: 

You won't have to water Coral Bells often once they establish themselves after the first year. An inch of water per week will suffice as long as they are in shady areas. Increase the watering frequency in hotter climates. 

Tips: 

You can deadhead these flowers for a manicured look. Although they won't re-bloom once deadheaded, they will transfer energy to the leaves just in time for the Fall. How lovely!

3. Delphiniums

Blooming cultivar hybrid Delphium (Pacific Giant group) 'Black Knight' in the summer garden

These gorgeous flowers come in an array of colors, from purple, blue, pink, and white. They are long and stalky, so you'll need garden stakes to assist them best. Overall, they do best in cool summers, making them ideal for Zone 5 areas. 

Soil:

Delphiniums grow best in early spring in alkaline soil. Mix a little compost in with your dirt to help with this. Once you get this right, these plants are uncomplicated to grow.

Light:

Delphiniums prefer cool, lightly shaded areas. A gentle afternoon sun won't do any damage but steer clear of harsh and bright sunlight. Keep in mind that they can handle about 6 to 8 hours of sunlight per day.

Water: 

Don't let these plants dry out. Keep the soil moist by watering often. Consider planting Delphiniums sheltered from the elements, like sudden rain, which can damage the long and slender plant.

Tips:

Delphiniums are highly poisonous, so gardeners beware. If ingested, these flowers can cause nausea, muscle twitching, and even in some cases, death. If you have pets or kids around, we suggest avoiding this plant.

4. Phlox

Garden Phlox paniculata, vivid summer flowers. Creeping Phlox subulata, also known as the moss phlox.

A special feature of Phlox is that it attracts birds and butterflies and has a lovely fragrance. There are three different types of Phlox available. Whether it is low-growing, medium, or tall Phlox, they are a favorite choice for perennial lovers. 

Soil:

Phlox loves nutrient-dense soil, so adding compost to your soil mix is a must. This goes for all three varieties of this plant. Another tip, use a fork to aerate the soil for good drainage.

Light:

Tall Phlox does best in full sun, while the lower growing species prefer shaded areas. Because of the different varieties of this plant, double-check the lighting requirements for your particular plant. 

Water:

Phlox prefers evenly moist soil, though don't let it sit too long in stagnant water. Let the soil dry out and then water thoroughly, especially in the summer months. Mulching is also recommended to help keep the soil moist without having to water it too often.

Tips:

Deadhead these flowers to promote re-blooming and prevent mildew. These plants are susceptible to mold, so cut them back in the fall and remove any dead areas. Other than that, you can't go wrong with Phlox!

Click here to see these Phlox seeds on Amazon

5. Daylily

Reblooming daylily

Daylilies bloom almost all year round! In the spring, summer, and fall, they produce beautiful blooms in an array of colors. People admire them because they need almost no maintenance and have large, colorful flowers.

Soil:

Slightly acidic to neutral is the ideal soil for Daylilies. However, they are hardy enough to withstand poor soil conditions, so don't stress too much about getting the soil just right. In the event your Daylilies aren't thriving, you can always add compost to enrich the soil. 

Light:

Daylilies love the full sun, so don't plant them near trees or other tall plants where they will be under shade. Instead, they do beautifully on their own with direct sunlight all day. 

Water:

They are extremely drought tolerant and almost require no maintenance for watering. Win-win! Even so, when Daylilies are newly planted, give them some TLC and water once a week until they establish themselves. 

Tips:

All parts of Daylilies are edible and have a long history in the kitchen. From the foliage to the root, you can cook or boil them and use them in soups, sauces, or salads. It tastes somewhere between green peas and asparagus with a mild peppery flavor.

When Do I Plant Seeds In Zone 5?

Due to the shorter growing season and cooler climate, it's important to know when you should begin planting your seeds.

The first official date is May 30th for no danger of frost or freezing. Bear in mind, that May 30th is a ballpark date so pay attention to your local weather for the best planting dates.

What Other Plants Do Well In Zone 5?

We've reviewed the top 5 plants for Zone 5. Now you might be wondering, what other plants do well in my area? Let's go over a fabulous bonus plant that thrives in Zone 5, Hostas.

Hosta

Green bush Hosta

Hostas come in a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes. There are over 2,500 species! 

Soil:

Although Hostas are hardy and can tolerate poor soil, they do best in rich, organic soil that's slightly acidic. Dig a hole wide and deep enough to fit the plant and allow room for growth. They will come back year after year with little maintenance.

Light:

They thrive in shady areas, but some can tolerate sunny spots. A good rule of thumb is the lighter the color, the more sunlight they can withstand. Hosta in darker shades are best under shady trees. 

Water:

Hosta's need good drainage because they are susceptible to crown rot. You can go days or weeks without watering, with no harm done. In fact, they can tolerate drought seasons with very little water.

Tips:

Unfortunately, slugs love Hosta's and can leave holes in the leaves. However, putting down coffee grounds or sand around the base of the plant keeps them at bay.

What Gardening Tools Should I Use?

Having the right tools for successful gardening is essential! You will want a little bit everything; pruning shears, trowel, transplant trowel, hand rake, weeder, and a cultivator.

Click here to see these gardening tools on Amazon

Wrapping It Up

As you can see, Zone 5 has 5 beautiful, perennials that bloom all summer long with little to no maintenance required. Lavender, Coral Bells, Delphiniums, Phlox, and Daylilies all fit the bill. 

Made it to the end? Check out these related articles:

Can You Plant Perennials Before Last Frost?

When To Transplant Delphiniums [And How To]

Can Lavender Grow In Clay Soil?