12 Types Of Pine Trees For Landscaping

It’s no secret that pine trees are a beautiful addition to any landscape. The well-loved evergreens provide year-round landscape interest, supply shade, and can even serve as a wind or privacy barrier. They have a very distinct look and add a lot of beauty to any landscape.

So, if you’re looking for the perfect pine trees for landscaping, look no further. We compiled a list of 12 types of pine trees that are excellent options!

1. Red Pine

The Red Pine, or Norway Pine, is a very large evergreen tree that can reach between 50 and 80 feet in height while its width ranges quite a bit. It has a moderate growth rate. The pine has a long trunk with a strong red hue. Older trees develop a more oval habit. Its needles are long, measuring 5 to 6 inches in length, and twisted.

Its botanical name is Pinus resinosa.

It grows best if it receives 6 hours of sunlight each day, or a minimum of 4 hours. It grows best in USDA plant hardiness zones 2 through 5. The soil should be moist and well-draining.

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2. Mugo Pine

The Mugo Pine, also known as the Swiss Mountain Pine, can reach a height of 20 feet and a spread of 25 feet. It is a slow grower, only growing by a maximum height of 12 inches. The pine grows in a pyramidal, rounded shape full of dark green needles with a length between 1 and 2 inches. During the winter the needles turn a yellowish-green hue.

Its botanical name is Pinus mugo.

Plant the pine in USDA plant hardiness zones 3 through 7 for best results. Full sun and partial shade are ideal for the pine’s growth. As long as the soil is well-draining, the pine will do just fine.

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3. Scots Pine

At maturity, this pine can reach up to 60 feet in height and 40 feet in width. Each year, it can grow between 12 and 14 inches in height. The tree grows in a pyramidical form. Its blue-green needles turn yellowish-green during the winter months, providing year-round color interest. The brown oval cones are 1 to 3 inches in length.

Its botanical name is Pinus sylvestris.

It’s best to grow the Scots Pine in USDA plant hardiness zones 3 through 7. The pine should receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight every day. It does well in any soil as long as it’s well-draining.

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4. Japanese Umbrella Pine

Like its name might suggest, it has umbrella-shaped whorls of needles. The needles are a beautiful dark shade of green and glossy. As it grows, it develops more of a conical shape. It’s a slow grower, but can eventually reach a height between 25 and 30 feet and spread between 15 and 20 feet.

Its botanical name is Sciadopitys verticillata. As you may notice, it’s not in the genus “Pinus.” This is because it’s not a true pine!

You can plant them in USDA plant hardiness zones 5 through 8. The pine does best in moderate or full sun exposure. You’ll want to make sure it’s in a spot that has shade during the evening to prevent sunburn. They need organically rich soil that maintains moisture. Don’t plant them in heavy clay or alkaline soils.

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5. Limber Pine

At maturity, the Limber Pine will reach between 30 and 50 feet in height and a spread of 15 to 35 feet. It has dark blue-green needles in splays of 5. The trunk is thick and short and can develop a twisted form of branches low to the ground.

Its botanical name is Pinus flexilis.

The Limber Pine does best in USDA plant hardiness zones 4 through 7. Partial sun to full sun are needed for its optimal health. The soil needs to be moist and well-draining.

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6. Eastern White Pine

This pine has a very quick rate of growth, being able to grow over 24 inches each year. At maturity, it can reach between 50 and 80 feet in height and spread between 20 and 40 feet. Its blue-green needles are long and slender, grow in bundles of 5, and are soft and flexible. It grows in an oval, pyramidal shape.

Its botanical name is Pinus strobus.

This pine can grow in USDA plant hardiness zones 3 through 8. It prefers to get a minimum of 4 hours of sunlight per day. It performs best in moist soil, but can also tolerate other growing conditions.

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7. Norfolk Island Pine

The Norfolk Pine has a soft, delicate, lacy look to it. It has tiered branches and a slender pyramidal shape. Indoors, it can eventually grow up to 6 feet tall.

Its botanical name is Araucaria heterophylla. Even though it has “pine” in its name, it’s not a true pine. It’s a tropical plant native to the South Pacific.

Since it’s a tropical plant, it can’t survive in cold climates when planted outdoors. It can’t grow outdoors in USDA plant hardiness zones 9 or colder. When indoors, place it in a spot that gets medium to bright levels of light. It has a moderate level of water needs.

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8. Jack Pine

The Jack Pine reaches a mature height between 55 and 65 feet. It has an irregular rounded shape to it and its branches spread out and flatten a bit. The needles are short and packed into bundles of two.

Its botanical name is Pinus banksiana.

The Jack Pine grows in USDA plant hardiness zones 3 through 7. It’s very hard on dry, sandy soils but can adapt to moist soil. It’s well-suited for harsh northern climates.

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9. Oregon Green Austrian Pine

This pine is on the smaller side, reaching a mature height and width around 20 feet. Its green needles are very stiff and it has bright white “candles” grow vertically on the tip of the boughs each spring. Its branches are asymmetrical in their pattern of growth

Its botanical name is Pinus nigra.

Plant this pine in a spot that receives at least 6 hours of direct sunlight each day. It grows best in USDA plant hardiness zones . The soil should be well-draining and dry to relatively moist.

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10. Ponderosa Pine

The Ponderosa Pine is an incredibly impressive-sized tree, reaching a height between 60 and 100 feet and spreading 25 to 30 feet. It grows at a medium rate, increasing 13 to 24 inches each year. The pine grows into an irregular cylindrical shape. The needles are stout and green to yellowish in color and are tufted at the end of bare branches.

Its botanical name is Pinus ponderosa.

The Ponderosa Pine grows in USDA plant hardiness zones 3 through 7. Ideally, this pine should get at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. It adapts to all kinds of soil conditions, giving it quite a versatile number of growing areas. Once established, it’s very drought-tolerant.

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11. Italian Stone Pine

This incredible evergreen features a full, high, rounded canopy that looks a lot like an umbrella. At maturity, the pine reaches a height between 30 and 60 feet in height and a width between 30 and 50 feet. Each bundle contains 2 needles in it. The needles have a gorgeous vibrant green hue.

Its botanical name is Pinus pinea. This is one of few pine trees whose seeds are harvested for eating.

The Italian Stone Pine grows best in USDA plant hardiness zones 8 through 11. Position the tree in a spot that receives at least 6 hours of direct sunlight. Ensure that the soil is well-draining.

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12. Japanese Black Pine

At maturity and in a garden landscape, the Japanese Black Pine can reach a height between 25 and 30 feet and spread to a width between 20 to 35 feet. Its annual growth rate is 24 to 36 inches. Its foliage consists of vibrant green bundles of stiff, sharp needles. After a couple years, 2 to 3 inch brown cones form. There is also a shrubby version of this tree that’s perfect for a bonsai garden.

Its botanical name is Pinus thunbergii.

This pine can thrive in USDA plant hardiness zones 5 through 9. It needs full sun or partial shade to perform best. The soil should be moist and composed of sand, loam, and/or clay. Water frequently and regularly during its first few growing seasons.

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Take a look at these other pine tree guides-

15+ Pine Tree Landscaping Ideas

How To Grow A Pine Tree From Seed

Where To Buy Pine Trees

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